Authors: 
Marianist Lay Network of North America
A very practical, down-to-earth guide to forming and building communities, the suggested resources and strategies make this an invaluable tool for establishing and continuing faith-based communities. What sets this apart from other resources is the proven effectiveness of the ideas to actually work in the forming and sustaining of small communities.

by Marianist Lay Network of North America (MLNNA)

78 pgs.

 

 

This work is published by MLNNA and is being distributed by NACMS.

 

 

This dynamic, "living" document is based on the experiences of members of North American Lay Communities. It is "living" in the sense that the document is open-ended to possible future updates and additions. A very practical, down-to-earth guide to forming and building communities, the suggested resources and strategies make this an invaluable tool for establishing and continuing faith-based communities. What sets this apart from other resources is the proven effectiveness of the ideas to actually work in the forming and sustaining of small communities.

The work is divided into four parts-–a kind of step-by-step process that those beginning to establish or seeking to enrich their community will find useful and exceedingly practical. Part I addresses issues of "Growing Communities" with specific examples involved in balancing, developing, and building community. Part II offers "Group Survival Skills" that have been proven to work in community conflict situations and group dynamics. Part III presents the framework of community within the Marianist tradition, supported by a strong heritage from the Founders, reaching into the future of the Marianist Charism. Finally, Part IV allows the reader to benefit from both resources and networks which provide practical tips for formation of small communities.

". . . communities in the Marianist tradition pray, but are not prayer groups; provide mutual support, but are not self-help groups; serve, but are not service organizations; and are rooted in Marianist spirituality, but are not exclusive. Like a family, like the fabled communities of the early church, like a utopian vision of the future, they are complex and organic and serve many purposes."